Category: Cake recipe

FAQ: Do you have a 10″ Madeira cake recipe?

FAQ: Do you have a 10″ Madeira cake recipe?10" Madeira cake recipe

Yes I do, but boy do people seem to be having problems with it! It got to the point where I was starting to think there was something wrong with it. Readers were having cakes with soggy middles and deep dark crusts on the outside. There were massive domes and sunken middles. I was perplexed! So, I decided to double check the recipe. It came out perfectly. So here’s a post dedicated to exactly what I do to make my 10″ Madeira cake a success  – literally step by step.

Double check the size of your tin.

The first thing I did was measure the volume of water my 10″ cake could take. Previously I found it could hold 4000ml but I decided to try it with a little less – 3700ml. The reason for this is that when I make a larger cake the more mix in the tin the heavier the cake is. When I use a little less mix the cake seems to rise more. This was the case with this cake. Just removing 300ml of cake ingredients to this cake made all the difference.

Line and wrap your cake tin and chill it out!

I have always lined my cake tins using silicon paper and vegetable oil – to make it stick to the sides. Oil gives the cake a much softer finish. I know some people like a crust and if that’s the case keep using butter to grease your tins.

Once lined I wrap the cake tin with a strip of silicon paper tied with natural string. You can read more about this here. As you can see from the top photo, I use the same paper over and over and it still works well.

A new trick I recently read about was to chill the cake tin once it is lined. This further stops the outside of the cake from baking too quickly. I left mine in the fridge for 30 minutes before I filled it with cake mix and baked it.

10" Madeira cake recipeThe 10″ Madeira cake recipe

  • 235g butter at room temperature
  • 235g margarine at room temperature
  • 620g caster sugar
  • 3 tsp vanilla essence
  • 9 eggs large eggs at room temperature
  • 700g plain flour sieved
  • 5 tsp baking powder
  • 150ml hot water

Sugar syrup

  • 100ml water
  • 100g caster sugar
  • 1 tsp vanilla essence

How to make the 10″ Madeira cake.

  1. Pre-heat your oven to 180ºC (Fan oven160ºC) It’s really important to get the oven to the right temperature. The rising domes are usually caused by the oven being too hot. Sunken cakes are from when the oven temperature is too low – or the oven door is opened too early. My oven fluctuates (especially with cakes that are in the oven for a long time like this one!) so I tend to let it drop a little to 175ºC to allow for the differences during the bake. I still get a dome but I don’t mind. It means I can see how well the cake is baked and get to eat a bit too. Who doesn’t love off cuts? The biggest problems with baking this cake seem to come from using a fan oven. It just doesn’t bake as well. I tested the recipe out using my fan and the cake tasted completely different and was really heavy. My mum who has a gas oven always has the lightest, fluffiest Madeira cake known to man – I am very jealous! So if oyu can use a non fan oven do. If you can use gas – even better. One last word on temperatures is to invest in an Oven Thermometer . I trust mine way more than I trust the dial on my oven – which has lied to me from day one!
  2. Start teh cake mix by creaming the butter and margarine together. Make sure they are seamlessly blended before adding the sugar. Beat till it’s pale and fluffy. This will take at least 3-4 minutes. The whiter it looks the fluffier it is which makes a lighter cake. 
  3. Very slowly add the eggs – a spoonful at a time. The slower you add the eggs the less chance there is of the mixture curdling. I have found that I have a much better mix if I use my very fast hand held whisk rather than my beloved Kitchenaid stand mixer. The hand held is much faster and whips it all up into a frenzy catching every last bit of cake mix whereas the stand mixer gets most of it most of the time. There’s no comparison. If the mixture does start curdling (separating and looking a bit yuck) add a spoonful of flour during mixing to stop it.
  4. Add the vanilla essence and mix again till it’s well incorporated.
  5. When it comes to adding the dry ingredients I tend to sieve the flour and baking powder into a separate bowl and have the hot water ready. Add the flour and water in three goes. This produces the fluffiest and most moist cake rather than adding all the flour then all the water. Fold them in gently and slowly. Fold until the flour is just incorporated. The less mixing and folding the more air bubbles you’ll have to make a light and fluffy cake. 
  6. Pour the mixture into the cake tin. Using the back of a spoon spread the mix throughout the tin pushing it up the sides of the tin slightly leaving a well in the middle. I leave quite a deep well and still get a dome so be brave.
  7. I have been loosely covering my cakes as soon as they go into the oven with a piece of silicon paper with a hole in the middle. If I think the paper is going to touch the cake as it rises I grease it first. The hole is to allow the steam to escape. The paper keeps the cake more flat on top. I tend to remove the paper for the last 30 minutes so it can brown up.
  8. Bake for two hours in the centre of your oven. If you have the choice place your cake on a wire rack in the oven rather than a tray. A tray will stop the heat from circulating. I remove all the unused racks from the oven when I bake. Don’t be tempted to open the oven door for the first 30 minutes. It will make the cake sink.
  9. To test if your cake is fully baked insert a skewer into the centre of the cake – always the centre as this is the last area to bake. If it comes out clean without any cake mix residue it’s ready. If there is some moist mix on the end you need to pop it back in for a few minutes more. You can also press lightly on the top of the cake with a finger. If the cake bounces back instantly you know it’s done. If it takes more than 2-3 seconds then you know it needs more.

    When a cake bakes the outer edge bakes first (as it’s against the hot metal cake tin.) For this reason when the middle of your cake is baked the sides will shrink away from the cake tin. This is another good indicator that the cake is baked.

10" Madeira cake recipeThe sugar syrup

  1. To make the sugar syrup heat the water and sugar until the sugar is completely dissolved. Let it simmer for 2-3 minutes then add the flavour and leave to cool. I make my sugar syrup as soon as the cake goes into the oven then I leave it .
  2. Once your cake is removed from the oven let it sit for 5-10 minutes then use a pastry brush to brush the sugar syrup over the entire cake. You only need to cover each area of the cake once and avoid soaking the cake or you will end up with a big soggy mess not a nice moist cake. Make sure you get the edges of the cake covered as they tend to dry out the most. Some people worry that the cake will be overly sweet by adding the sugar syrup but it actually seals the cake and stops it from baking once it’s out of the oven. Don’t feel you need to use the whole amount. You will have some left over.
  3. Leave the cake to cool for a further 10-20 minutes before turning your cake out onto a rack to cool completely.

Madeira cake slice - recipe

I made this cake and decided not to cover it or cut it in half and fill with butter cream. One of my favorite ways to enjoy Madeira cake is by the slice with a lovely dollop of raspberry jam. I cut this one in half and froze one side while we ate the rest. This is a pretty big cake so it was a good test of how long it tasted good for. I always advise to have eaten a cake that has been decorated (and therefore sealed) within a week of baking. This cake sat on a plate in my kitchen loosely covered with a piece of silver foil for 10 days – slowly getting smaller and smaller. On the 10th day it was getting a bit stale but right up till then a spread of jam and it was great with a cup of tea!

Why Sugar syrup works

Another benefit to adding sugar syrup to a cake – which I hadn’t realised before is that it gives the cake crust a lovely sweet flavoured crunch. Not a hard crunch – just a gentle one. I actually looked forward to eating that part as much as I did the soft sponge. Nice surprise!

I think a lovely thin slice is perfect. Beau does not! After asking if she could have a slice this is what she cut and filled for herself! I could have made four servings from that giant slice. And before you ask- yes she ate the lot! Growing girl! Beau's big slice!!!

I hope this helps with some of your Madeira cake queries.

Happy baking

EmmaMT

x

Madeleine cakes by Tim

Madeleine cakes Madeleine cakes Yep, that’s right Mr MT did the baking this weekend and it was goooood!

A few weeks ago he announced that he wanted to make some Madeleine cakes but we didn’t have the right tin and let’s face it Madeleine cakes don’t taste right if they’re not the right shape do they now? So, I got in touch with Eddingtons. You may not know Eddington’s by name but as a keen baker you have definitely seen their baking goodies on the shelves. They’re sold all over the place and now I’ve mentioned them to you you’ll be spotting their cake tinsCookie cutters and kitchen gadgets all over the place.

Madeleine cakes

I have always found their bake-wares to be really top notch quality which is why I approached them. The Madeleine cake tin is really tough, thick and completely non-stick which if you’ve ever looked at my shortbread fiasco I mean post, you’ll know why this is essential! It’s also dishwasher safe – another bonus. Tim hunted around my baking book shelf for a recipe but once the tin arrived he decided to follow the recipe on the packaging.  Orange Madeleines. Who wouldn’t?

So armed with his tin and a recipe he embarked on making as much mess as possible in our little kitchen which he did with much success!!!
Madeleine cakes

 Orange Madeleine cake recipe

Makes 24 cakes

  • 110g  (2/3 cup) flour
  • 1/4 tsp baking powder
  • 113g (1/2 cup) melted butter – cooled
  • 2 eggs
  • 1/2 tsp orange extract
  • 1/2 tsp orange zest
  • 130g (1 cup) icing sugar
  1. Heat the oven to 170ºC). Spray the pan with a non stick spray or brush a little melted butter into each well like Tim did. Then dust a little flour over the top. This is the trick to the Madeleines literally falling out of the tin once they’re baked.
  2. Sift together the flour and baking powder in a small bowl.
  3. In another bowl use an electric whisk to beat the eggs, orange zest and extract on a high speed for five minutes. Gradually beat in the icing sugar. Whisk until it becomes thicker – another five minutes.
  4. Gently fold in the flour mixture then the melted butter until smooth.
  5. Spoon the mixture into the tins filling to 3/4 full.
  6. Bake for 8 minutes or until the edges start to brown. Cool in the pan for 1-2 minutes. Loosen the cakes with a knife then invert the pan on a rack and watch them pop out.
  7. Once completely cool sprinkle with icing sugar

Madeleine cakes

I couldn’t leave them alone. The whole house smelt amazing. The Madeleine’s were so light in texture and the hint of orange flavour was really just perfect. Tim made them in two batches and we’d eaten half the first lot before they had even cooled down! I had to be really strong willed not to eat more before I had taken the photos to share with you guys.

Fingers crossed he makes some more this weekend. I could get used to him baking!

Enjoy!

EmmaMT

Eddingtons Non-Stick Madeleine Pan RRP £24.95 available from www.PoshRosh.co.uk

 

Disclaimer: Eddingtons sent me this Madeleine cake tin (thanks you guys!) All thoughts and opinions are my own.

 

 

Lemon and Blueberry tray bake recipe

Lemon and Blueberry tray bake recipe

Lemon and Blueberry tray bake recipeMost Friday’s my dad pops round to my house with a delivery of fruit and veg that would rival a Sainsbury’s delivery truck. He gets it for us (that’s me and my sister – as she gets a delivery too) to share as he bought us both a Nutribullet last November and we’re all mad keen on smoothies now – especially Tim. I got told off for not drinking my smoothie earlier this week. Tim makes Nutribullet smoothies first thing in the morning and then that’s it.  Six AM and we’ve already had our 5 a day! So we really go through a lot of fruit and veg. How cool is that? My Poopah is the best. (Thanks Poopah)

Last week he bought some blueberries. There were loads and loads of them;  more than we could blend in a week – so you know what I wanted to do don’t you? Yep. Bake!

I decided that I would make a tray bake- as I’ve just made a load for other people recently and there was no cake in the house! Well, with all that healthy smoothie making I needed to address the sugar/healthy eating imbalance. This tray bake is adapted from a Mary Berry recipe that I have used time and again from her Baking Bible book.

When Tim tasted it he said “I’m not sure about the lemon and blueberry combination”. I thought it tasted great. I then went off for a bit and when I came back the three slices of cake I had just cut were gone. Errrrr? Not such a bad combination after all is it Tim?

Lemon and Blueberry tray bakeLemon and Blueberry tray bake recipe

  • 225g butter at room temperature
  • 225g Golden caster sugar
  • 275 Self Raising flour
  • 2 tsp baking powder
  • 4 large eggs – at room temperature
  • zest and juice of one lemon
  • 2 tbsp water
  • 150g blueberries for the cake plus some extras for decoration.
  • 100g icing sugar
  • juice of one lemon
  1. Line an 8 x 10″ tray with silicon paper. Pre-heat your oven to 180C (160C for fan ovens)
  2. Mix the butter and sugar together until well blended. Break up the eggs in a bowl then add slowly to the cake mix so that it doesn’t curdle.
  3.  In a separate bowl sieve the flour and baking powder then add to the butter/sugar mix. Add the lemon zest and juice and water. Whisk until smooth and creamy.
  4. Gently fold in the blueberries then pour the mix into the tray. Level it with the back of a large tablespoon and bake for 34-45 minutes until the cake comes away from the side of the cake tin and the cake bounces back instantly when pressed in the centre with your finger.
  5. Set on a cooling rack for 10 minutes before removing from the tin to cool completely.
  6. Once cool make the icing by sieving the icing sugar into a bowl then adding the lemon juice and mixing until smooth. You can add lemon zest to the icing too if you want. Add the blueberries to the top then leave for 30 minutes and allow it to set.

 

This is a great cake to share. What do you think? Lemon and blueberry a winning combination or not?

EmmaMT

Book Review: Konditor & Cook. Reservedly legendary baking

Konditor & Cook : Book review

Konditor & Cook. Reservedly legendary baking

This is not your average baking book. This one’s different! “Why?” I hear you ask. Well the recipes are just not what you’d expect…. but in a good way. The combinations are different and unusual and dare I say it – intriguing like ‘Melon and Ginger’ slinger – which sounds more like a smoothie than a tart and ‘101% Apple pie’! How do you do that?

 

Konditor & Cook: Book reviewThe shop

For those who don’t know Konditor & Cook is a little cake shop tucked out behind Waterloo East station on Cornwall road in London. I used to walk past it on my way to work in the mornings and always had to have a good look in the window as I passed by. There was always a line of people queueing outside waiting to pick up their morning coffee and cake. Whenever someone had a birthday or celebration on the magazine a cake would be ordered from K&C – until I started baking that is!

Konditor & Cook: Book review

The Author

Konditor and Cook is the brainchild of Gerhard Jenne. He opened his little baking shop in 1993 using his skills as a pastry chief from Germany; where he studied before moving to England and training under Justin De Blank. This book is full of his most popular recipes. There’s a lot of German influence in the bakes but none of the obvious recipes. I haven’t heard of a lot of the cakes here but they look and sound so good.

Konditor & Cook: Book review

One of the best things about this book is that everything has a real “depth of flavour” as Gerhard says that’s the most important thing -and I think we would all agree with him on that? You don’t need specialist equipment to make any of these cakes – even the more decorated ones at the back- and his ethos that the recipes are easy to make just works in this day and age of our busy lives

Most of these recipes don’t take a lot of time or energy, just enthusiasm and a keen appetite” Gerhard Jenne

Konditor & Cook: Book reviewSo what’s in the book?

The book includes the following chapters. Here’s a few but by all means not all bakes included.

Cakes

Figgy fruit loaf – a cake for cheese, Stem ginger, Almond St Clement cake and sunken pear and black gingerbread cake to name just a few

Tarts and puddings

Choose from Raspberry fudge tart (a favorite at the shop), Rhubarb and orange Meringue, twice baked raspberry ricotta cheesecake with a thyme crust, Strawboffie pie, summer pudding sand and there’s more

Mini bakes

Jammilicious Linzers, Raspberry rocks Meringues (which have raspberries baked in the centres- yum), lemon and currant puff – which are next on my list, Very berry tartlets (as seen above) Kipferl cookies; a traditional Christmas biscuit in Germany,

Brownies and slices

This is where I started when I first got the book. I made the Boston brownies and they are divine! There’s also Whisky and fig brownies, Bakewell slab, Hot cross Blondies and Tarta de Santiago which was inspired by Brindisa a local Borough Market Spanish food importer.

Muffins, cupcakes and buns

If there’s one recipe that is going to get you excited in this chapter it’s the ‘Black velvet cupcakes with Irish cream frosting’. All I really have to say about this is Bailey’s Irish cream liquer. The rest you can imagine! Other tasty sounding bites are Dorset apple cakes, Iced prune buns – these are a really cute domed shape and look super delish – I’m making them this weekend.

Fun and festivities

This is where your creative talents can get into action. There are K&C’s signature ‘Magic cakes’ (I’m sure they’re called this as they disappear!), Spaghetti Bolognese cupcakes, The chocolate cabbage cake (as seen below) don’t worry it’s all chocolate and just looks like a cabbage – there’s not a green leaf to be seen inside this creation. The mulled wine cupcakes also sound amazing.

Basics, tips and techniques

Not only is this chapter full of really good, solid advice but there are more recipes and tips throughout it. There are more pastry recipes as well as frostings, custard and lemon curd all of which can be used with the recipes throughout the book. There are tips on piping, lining a cake tin and how to temper chocolate.

Konditor & Cook: Book review

My thoughts on Konditor & Cook. Reservedly legendary baking.

The photography is a lot darker and moodier in this book than in the average baking book which I’m not usually a massive fan of but with these recipes it just works. I really love the details about each bake before the recipe – either where it originates from or who inspired it. It makes the book really informative and personal, but it’s the extra details in the ‘Basics, tips and techniques’ chapter that make it a must. There are tons of really useful tips and advice that I haven’t seen before. I also really like the way it’s written. You feel like you’re having a chat with your baker friend Gerhard who’s sharing his best knowledge with you. It’s so relaxed and chatty.

Having made quite a few recipes from this book – the Boston Brownies are to die for! I really like this book. It’s good to have something a bit different on your  kitchen shelves. It has a few old favorites – coffee cake, lemon meringue pies and strawberry tarts, but the more unusual recipes are what I rate the most.

Konditor & Cook: Deservedly Legendary Baking by Ebury Press available on Amazon

Do you have this book? Would you buy it and if so why? I’d love to know.

EmmaMT x

Inspired Recipes : Stork Salted Caramel Marble cake

Stork Salted Caramel Marble cake. Nom nom nomHow many times have you bought some baking ingredients and seen a recipe on the side of the packaging and thought “Oooooo that looks good. I must make that some time!” and then used up the flour/sugar/butter and thrown the packaging away? Loads of times if you’re anything like me. Well, last week I picked up a tub of Stork margarine and when I went to make my cake there was a really tasty looking recipe on that paper lining you get just under the lid. “Right!” I thought. This Salted Caramel Marble cake looks totally deeelish so I AM going to make it. So I did. For camping!

Family Camping

Last weekend my family- that’s the Moomah and Poopah, my sister, her husband and son and Tim, me and the girls all went off on a camping trip to Suffolk. Now, if you live here in the UK you’ll know that it was rather wet and windy last weekend but that didn’t dampen our spirits (but it did dampen our clothes on Sunday. Actually soaked would be a better description) We had a really lovely weekend. Lots of marshmallows around the camp fire (no there wasn’t any sining) and lots of laughter. And lots of eating. I wanted to take a cake with as a treat so I baked the Stork Salted Caramel Marble cake on Thursday night and wrapped it in foil as soon as it was cool then made the icing topping Friday morning and popped it in a jam jar ready for the off. Our car was so jam packed with equipment that I had a sleeping bag and football at my feet for the entire three hour journey up there –  so a sticky cake wasn’t going to happen till we were there. I have to say I’ve never covered a cake whilst in a tent before (some may say I’m cake obsessed!) There I was hunched over the low table smearing the salted caramel icing over the cake with a plastic spoon. Was it worth it? Oh boy yes it was! Salted Caramel Marble cake The cake was incredibly light and fluffy. It tasted great.  Tim loved the salted caramel topping and combined with the dark and white chocolate cake it was a total hit on a rather chilly and windy evening. This cake is my attempt at glamping.

Slice of Stork Salted Caramel Marble cakeStork’s Salted Caramel Marble cake

Cake Ingredients

  • 175g Stork
  • 175g Caster sugar
  • 175g Self raising flour (sieved)
  • 3 Medium eggs
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 55g plain chocolate- melted
  • 55g white chocolate – melted

Salted Caramel icing Ingredients

  • 250g light soft brown sugar
  • 150ml double cream
  • 140g Stork
  • ½ tsp salt
  1. Place all the ingredients in a mixing bowl except for the chocolate and beat well until smooth. Split the mixture between two bowls and add melted dark chocolate to one and white chocolate to another.
  2. Alternate spoonfuls of mixture into a greased bottom lined 20cm (8″) cake tin and gently swirl through the mixture with a skewerMaking marble cake
  3. Bake in a pre-heated oven 170ºC, 160ºC fan for 50-60minutes. Leave to cool.
  4. To make the icing place sugar, cream and salt in a saucepan and heat until the sugar dissolves. Bubble for 3-4 minutes not stirring. Cool for 10 minutes, beat in stork. Chill until firm.
  5. Split the cake and sandwich together with half the icing. Cover the top with the remaining salted caramel icing.

I should point out that the original recipe on the packaging had a delicious looking chocolate ganache topping with truffles to finish. Although it looked amazing it was a step to far for camping so I just added the icing on the top and it was soooo good. What’s more it stayed soft for a few days. So where is the craziest place you’ve decorated a cake? I’d love to know.

EmmaMT

p.s. Thanks to Stork for allowing me to share your recipe with my readers. I’m sure they’ll love it!

Whisky cake recipe – perfect for Father’s Day

Whiskey cakeFather’s day whisky cake

This is a cake I made for AchicaLiving.com to celebrate Father’s day. My dad likes a drop of Whiskey and I thought it was a pretty manly way to make a cake – if you follow my meaning.

When I make a cake for Achica I have to make it ahead of time. It’s a planned post -usually weeks before it goes live, so I decided to soak the fruit and make the cake a few days later, but three days turned into three weeks and the fruits which were soaking in the whiskey were seriously alcoholic by that time! When I finally got around to baking the cake my in laws were popping round for a cuppa so they were my gineau pigs. They loved it. I cut a massive slice for my dad and took it round all wrapped up. I set it down on the table and said “Here’s a slice of whiskey cake for you” and his eyes literally lit up. So when we celebrated his birthday last week it was a no brainer what cake I was going to make!

Whiskey cake Rocks!Whiskey Cake

Ingredients

  • 200g dried apricots (cut into small pieces) 
  • zest and juice of one lemon
  • 150ml whisky
  • 175g butter at room temperature
  • 175g brown sugar (sieved)
  • 3 egg yolks
  • 3 egg whites
  • 50ml whisky
  • 200g self raising flour 
  • ½ tsp baking powder

For the topping(chocolate topping as seen on the AchicaLiving post)

  • 50g butter
  • 100g milk chocolate
  • 1 tbsp whisky
  • 100g icing sugar
  • 1 tbsp milk 
  1. For the best tasting cake place the fruits in an airtight container with the whisky and lemon zest and juice and leave to infuse for 48-72 hours. You can leave it for longer to give the fruits a stronger flavour.
  2. To make the cake, oil (with sunflower oil) and line an 8” cake tin with greaseproof paper. Preheat your oven to 180ºC (Fan oven160ºC).
  3. Mix the butter and sugar in a bowl then add the yolks one at a time. Incorporate the whisky. 
  4. Sieve the flour and baking powder into the mix and combine well. 
  5. In a separate bowl whisk the egg whites till they form stiff peaks then fold them in till completely incorporated.
  6. Finally add the boozy fruits making sure to get every drop of whiskey out of the container and all the fruit is coated in cake mix. 
  7. Pour into your cake tin and level with the back of a spoon. Bake for 45-50 minutes until the top is golden brown and the sides have come away from the tin. 
  8. Remove from the oven and leave to cool in the tin for ten minutes before turning out onto a wire rack to cool completely. 

To make the frosting.

  1. Once the cake is completely cold place the chocolate and butter in a saucepan over a low heat until they are completely melted. Stir continuously. Add the whisky then set aside to cool for a few minutes. 
  2. Sieve the icing sugar into a bowl then add the chocolate mix. Whisk until combined then add a little milk at a time. The ganache should look glossy. 
  3. Leave to cool for a few minutes before covering your cake completely. 

EmmaMT

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