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How to make a Baymax birthday cake

How to make a Baymax birthday cake

How to make a Baymax Birthday cake

Last month I was asked to make Dulcie’s 5th Birthday cake and it wasn’t a Baymax birthday cake. In fact I feel a bit guilty that my first response when asked was ‘Oh no, not another Minecraft cake with hundreds and hundreds of little green squares!” Dulcie’s mum very graciously changed her mind to a Baymax cake and I was soooo pleased. Not only that it wasn’t a Minecraft one but because we loved Big Hero 6 and I knew Baymax was going to be a fun one to do.

The challenge was to make him a bit interesting and not just a big white figure on a cake board. Dulcie’s mum said “No pink”. It sounds like Dulcie is like Darcey – properly feminine and a complete tomboy at the same time. She also asked for the cake to be blue. “No problem” I said. And then I tried to make it!

The impossible blue Baymax birthday cake !

I set off on a google research mission. I’ve coloured my madeira cake before but never a specific blue colour and I know from the past that a yellowy, cream cake mix will not make a blue cake. It will be green! I even asked at the cake decorating shop how to do it. They weren’t sure so we looked for a ‘white’ cake to bake that could be coloured on line. The cake on the blog we found was as pure as snow. The author had removed egg yolks and replaced them with buttermilk. She used white butter- which we can’t get here (if you know of any please let me know) and it looked light and fluffy. I tried. It was not pretty! The cake was very light in colour but no where near white enough. I added the blue colouring and baked it. It came out illuminous turquoise. Not good. It also went completely solid after one day, even though it was double wrapped in cling film. Yuck!

For the next trial I baked my madeira cake, removing the egg yolks – replacing them with double cream, I used sunflower oil instead of the very yellow margarine and I used President butter – the whitest butter I know of. It still came out deep green but it was marvelously flat and very soft. In the end- running out of time,  I had to see if a green cake would be okay and when Dulcie’s mum said “Go for it” I made another batch of my madeira cake – again making it as light in colour as possible and only adding a touch of blue colour and the end result was lovely. Pfew!

How to make a Baymax Birthday Cake

This cake was relatively straight forward to make. As long as you have enough cakes to stack you’re good to go.  Cover the cake board a few days in advance so it has time to harden.

To shape the cakeHow to make a Baymax Birthday cake

I used a number of tins with paper liners in them as I didn’t have enough of the same size to get the height. The paper cases were for 7″ cakes. I made 3 x 7″, 1 x 6″, 1 x christmas pudding bowl – for the curved shoulders and one 4″ cake for the head. I used my 9″ Madeira cake mix and split the cake mix between the tins.

As the cakes were so uneven I flattened off the tops and stacked the cake to see how it would look. Once I was happy I added buttercream between each cake and smoothed the shape of the body. To make the cake secure and prevent the layers slipping off one another I pushed three wooden skewers into the body and snipped the ends off.

To make the headHow to make a Baymax Birthday cake

The head was a small 4″ cake. Use a sharp bread knife to shape it into a head shape then cover in buttercream and then cover with sugarpaste. I made the head first so it could harden up a little for when I needed to handle it into place later.

To cover the bodyHow to make a Baymax Birthday cake

Once cut to shape cover the body in a crumb coating of buttercream. Place it in the fridge to set for 10-15 minutes. I had to remove a shelf to fit him in. Then add a second coat of buttercream to get a smooth surface for the sugarpaste to sit on. I like to chill the second coat for another ten minutes but it’s not essential.

Roll out the sugarpaste quite thick – around the depth of two £1 coins. I covered the body in one go so as I lifted the sugarpaste off the work surface I knew it would stretch and likely tear if it wasn’t thick enough. As it’s positioned it does get thinner. To make sure there are no creases lift the sugarpaste at the bottom up and gently lift it away from the cake with one hand while smoothing it down with the other. This action will stretch the sugarpaste into shape and prevent creases. This does take some practice but just take it slow and don’t be afraid to pull the sugarpaste away furhter than feels right. Tuck the paste right into the base of the cake and remove any excess. I was able to lift the cake up and tuck the sugarpaste underneath then place Baymax onto the cake board (with royal icing to make him stay in place). I then rubbed down where my hand was to make him smooth again.

Use a drop of royal icing to position the head in place.

To add the arms and details
How to make a Baymax Birthday cake

The arms and legs were made from sugarpaste. Roll out sausage shapes then make them gently squared off at the ends. On the legs use a palette knife to make groves where the feet are and on the arms cut an additional oval for the elbows. Both the arms and legs were stuck into position with royal icing. The arms need to be held for a minute till they stick and won’t slide off. Once the arms were secured four fat sausage fingers and thumbs were added.

The badge on Baymax’s chest was made with a circle cutter. A palette knife was then used to make the detail lines in the centre.

For the face be really careful to position the eyes- cut out from black sugarpaste and a line of sugarpaste, exactly where you want them to be. Black sugarpaste is really sticky and once it’s on you won’t get the marks off. Luckily Baymax’s face is really simple. I used edible glue to position them so there was no chance of seepage.

Decorations for the Baymax birthday cake How to make a Baymax Birthday cake

I really love writing names in sugarpaste since I made Asher’s climbing wall cake . Again, I wrote the name out in a big black marker on paper and placed silicon paper over the top then traced the letters in a long thin line of rolled out sugarpaste. I then left the name to dry. Drying a name takes around 4-5 days but you can speed the process up by placing it in a warm (not hot or it will melt) oven. I put my oven on to 50ºC for five minutes then I turn it off and place the name inside for only 10 minutes. Remove it and leave it to cool completely. Repeat if you want the name firmer. The firmer the name the easier it is to handle and the less likely it is to break. Use Royal icing under and behind the name to stick it in place.

As the cake was going to be pretty bland with just Baymax I made little cubes of sugarpaste into wrapped gifts by adding ribbons and bows on top. They were placed around Baymax. I also didn’t just want to have a number 5 any where so I made a mini birthday cake complete with five candles for the number to sit on. I did this with thick sugarpaste cut out into circles in beige and then had smaller white discs (for cream) with red ‘jam’ over the top. These were layered up together with royal icing to hold them together.  If I was to change anything about this cake it would be to make the sponge layers of this mini cake more brown. Next time!  The candles were thin florists paste (as it dries harder quicker) with sugarpaste flames on top. I used red and orange sugarpaste which wasn’t completely blended together to make the flames more interesting.

How to make a Baymax Birthday cake

So, that was it. I really loved making this Baymax birthday cake. I think it works for boys or girls, you just change the colours to suit. What do you think?

All that’s left to say is

Happy Birthday Dulcie you gorgeous smiley munchkin you. xxx

EmmaMT

x

How to make a Rock climbing birthday cake

How to make a rock climbing birthday cake/ http://cakesbakesandcookies.com/how-to-make-a-ro…ng-birthday-cake/How to make a Rock climbing birthday cake

 

My little nephew Asher isn’t that little any more! He’s eight already. Last weekend he had a climbing party and before Christmas he told me exactly what he wanted his cake to be. Yes I know, you can see it’s a rock climbing cake!

The party was for 7 kids so I did go a little over board with the size of this cake. It could have fed 40! Well, I do only have one nephew! (on that side of the family anyway!)

How to design a rock climbing cake

How to make a rock climbing birthday cake/ http://cakesbakesandcookies.com/how-to-make-a-ro…ng-birthday-cake/

I started off with a drawing of the climber. I am often disappointed with the models I make – thinking that legs or arms look too long/short/wonky, so I decided to make a plan. You know the saying “Fail to plan and you plan to fail” I wanted to use the drawings as guides.

Making the loopy name

To make the name and climber firm enough to handle I made them a week before the party. The name was made by rolling out a long strip of white sugar paste with a little Tylo Powderkneaded in. Tylo powder has a firming action on the icing. It gets harder much quicker than when left to dry naturally over a few days – I wanted to be sure it wouldn’t break.

A piece of silicon paper was positioned over the hand written name then I bent and looped the sugarpaste strip cutting and gluing from behind using edible glue where necessary– mainly behind the ‘A’. I then placed it along marzipan spacers to make sure it was level and set it on a tray to dry out.How to make a rock climbing birthday cake/ http://cakesbakesandcookies.com/how-to-make-a-ro…ng-birthday-cake/

Making the climber

Having a guide for the climber made it so much easier. I will definitely make models this way again. The climber was also made with sugarpaste. First the Tshirt was made then the legs were attached. I made the sugarpaste damp and pressed each piece together but next time I will use edible glue. After a few days the arms hadn’t stuck so I had to use edible glue in the end anyway.

The arms were easy to make and I simply cut lines in the flattened ends to make fingers. Then a decorators tool was used to soften the edges and make fingernails. (the pic below is before the fingers were softened!) Once the arms and shoes were attached I made a hole in the neck using a cocktail stick. This is so that the head can be attached later. How to make a rock climbing birthday cake/ http://cakesbakesandcookies.com/how-to-make-a-ro…ng-birthday-cake/

To make the head

A piece of white sugarpaste was coloured with a dot of paprika coloured food gel and was rolled into a ball. A balling tool was used to make dents for the eyes and a tiny ball for the nose. White balls of sugarpaste were placed in the eye sockets and a small dent was made for the smile. A cocktail stick was cut in half and then pushed in to a piece of polystyrene so only 1cm stuck out and the head was then placed on top. In my experience if you try to push the stick into the  sugarpaste the head will either contort or the cocktail stick will poke out of the top, either way – we don’t want that. This way you have more control. Once the head is on the stick leave it to go hard enough to handle without squishing – 3-4 days.

After 3-4 days the head was then decorated with pale brown eye brows and tiny eyelashes and the eyes were painted black. A very pale pink was used to outline the mouth. A dry brush was used to dust a tiny amount of pink powder onto the cheeks to give them a glow. Finally the brown royal icing hair was piped on the top. A cocktail stick was used to make the hair a bit more curly. Again it was left to completly firm up. The head is the last thing to go on once the body is on the cake. How to make a rock climbing birthday cake/ http://cakesbakesandcookies.com/how-to-make-a-ro…ng-birthday-cake/

To stack the cake

This cake was always going to be bumpy in texture – yay for not having to make a cake look perfectly smooth!! –  and I wanted it to have a flat front. So as not to waste any cake mix I used round cake tin liners (like these cake tin liners) and scrunched up some tin foil to make up the space along one side of a 6, 7 and 8″ cake tin  while they were baking- yes I know – waaaayyyy too much cake! Once out of the tins there wasn’t much carving to do.

Each Madeira cake was cut in half and the middle was filled with seedless raspberry jam and buttercream and the same between each cake – that’s why it got so tall!  I didn’t want to put boards between the cakes – which you should do with a cake this big so I used skewers to keep the whole cake together. I was really nervous driving this cake to my sister’s house so if you are travelling with a cake this tall stack it properly with boards and dowels like this.  The front was trimmed so it was less bumpy and the whole cake was given a buttercream coating. 

How to make a rock climbing birthday cake/ http://cakesbakesandcookies.com/how-to-make-a-ro…ng-birthday-cake/

To cover the cake

The blue icing was rolled out so it could be lifted over the tall cake. This was no mean feat and if this was a wedding cake of this size I would have covered the sides then the top but as it is I went for one big covering. I did have a seam at the back but for this cake it wasn’t a problem. I made it as neat as I could.

I wanted the surface to be gently bumpy so I dug my fingertips all over the blue sugarpaste to give a more rock like appearance. I then added the rock climbing handles. These were made by rolling our different coloured sugarpaste into balls then flattening one side of the ball and adhering them all over the cake with edible glue. I loved the colours- perfect for an eight year old.

Screen Shot 2016-01-27 at 16.11.52

Adding the climber

To stick Asher the climber onto the cake I stuck coloured climbing handles under his hand while the handle sugarpaste was still soft. I pushed the dried hands into the soft sugarpaste so it looked like he was gripping them. Piping royal icing into the hole in the body before I stuck his head in place – this has been a winner for not having models loose their heads!  To stick the model onto the cake I used royal icing under the hands, body and behind the feet. Once I had positioned him and held him there for 30 seconds I placed a cocktail stick into the cake under the feet to stop him slipping down. Once I knew he was well and truly stuck I replaced the cocktail sticks with climbing handles.
How to make a rock climbing birthday cake/ http://cakesbakesandcookies.com/how-to-make-a-ro…ng-birthday-cake/

Finishing touches

The bottom of the cake looked a bit plain so I made different sized rocks to match the cake covering and placed them all around the bottom of the cake. I made bigger ones for the very left and right of the cake for the name to sit against. Royal icing was piped onto the back of the ‘Asher’ to stickit to the rocks.

I decided to make the ‘8’ to sit on the top at the last minute. To make sure it was hard I mixed the red sugarpaste with some Tylo powder, rolled it out and shaped the number then pushed a cocktail stick diagonally into it. I then placed it in the oven at 50ºC for 10 minutes. I removed it, let it cool completely then repeated. On the second cool it was firm. I left it over night to give it an extra chance to harden then stuck it in the cake the next morning with a little royal icing for good measure and had a few blue rocks around it for effect. This worked really well but the red colour did darken a little.

The last addiditons were the long strand of rope which was looped around the eight with a little curl at the bottom and the harness I added to the climber.

How to make a rock climbing birthday cake/ http://cakesbakesandcookies.com/how-to-make-a-ro…ng-birthday-cake/

I really loved this cake. It was a monster in size but the colours worked really well and I tried out a few new techniques that I will definitely do again like the way I did the name and using a plan to make the model.

When I delivered the cake before the party Asher came to see it and didn’t say a word – he just hugged me really tight for what seemed like ages. Ahhhhh, I love that. Big love from the little man. So all that’s left to say is

Happy Birthday ADF. I’ve gotta lotta love for you! 

EmmaMT x




Cake inspiration from Sweetapolita: Chocolate Torte Madeira Sprinkle Birthday Cake

 Chocolate Torte Madeira Sprinkle Birthday CakeSprinkle Birthday cake

Where do you get your cake inspiration from? I follow quite a lot of blogs but I only stay subscribed if they keep on delivering great inspiration month after month. If they don’t post for a few weeks I don’t really mind as when they do it’s always amazing new content and that’s how I feel about Sweetapolita. She has a very distinctive style and I always want to have a go at recreating her cakes. Her style was the inspiration for this cake. 

BeauBeau is TWELVE!!!! 

Where does the time go. I’ve been writing this blog for over four years and each year my daughter’s birthday cake posts seem to come round quicker and quicker. For the first time in ages I actually can believe Beau is twelve. She is so much more happy and mature than she was last year. She’s settled into senior school really well and has a lovely group of new friends who we met for the first time on Sunday. One of them even offered to help carry over the drinks for all the gang while we were at bowling! I mean literally said “Would you like me to help you carry the drinks over“!!! How happy am I that Beau has found such polite and friendly group of girls to hang out with? VERY.Sprinkle Birthday cake

So, when it came to her birthday cake she asked for something simple, chocolatey and pretty. Gone are the days of sculpting cakes into fancy designs. In fact I can’t actually remember the last time I was asked to do that. I knew exactly which of Sweetapolita’s cake designs I was going to make. Lots of soft chocolate ganache buttercream and lots and lots of pretty sprinkles! 

Now, I would say that this cake is quick and easy to make and I am sure it is, but not when you are desperate to finish season 4 of Prison Break on Netflix and can’t stop watching it and stay up till 3am to do so! Without Netflix it would have been sooo much quicker! 

Chocolate Torte Madeira Cake 

[yumprint-recipe id=’4′]Beau and her Sprinkle Birthday cake

Happy Birthday Beau Beau Bob. We love you so much. 

Emma (a.k.a. Mamma.xxx)

How to make easy jam: Rhubarb Jam recipe

How to make easy jam: Rhubarb Jam recipe

Rhubarb jam recipe

Have you ever made jam?

I hadn’t until recently. I thought I needed a ton of equipment- a big pan (which has been tricky since getting an induction hob!) a thermometer, special spatulas etc. But, you just don’t need them. All you need is a regular deep saucepan, a wooden spoon to stir, a plate or two for testing and a clean jar to put it in with a sealable lid and a piece of waxed paper. That’s it. The process is super simple and the ingredients list isn’t very long at all.

You can print this recipe here

How to make easy jam

This recipe yields one large jar (¾ litre) or two regular jam jar sizes

  • 445g Rhubarb
  • Juice of one unwaxed lemon
  • 225g Jam sugar (with pectin)
  1. Place 2-3 saucers in the freezer for testing the jam on later.
  2. Sterilise the jam jars. You can buy sterilising tablets and soak or submerge the jars in a pan of water and bring to the boil for 10 minutes, but if you clean and use them when they are still hot straight from the dishwasher that’s sterilised enough too.
  3. Cut the rhubarb into small pieces and place in a deep saucepan
  4. Measure the sugar and add it to the pan along with the squeezed lemon juice making sure there are no pips
  5. Add water to the ingredients till it’s just covered and place on a low heat.
  6. Once the sugar has dissolved turn the heat up so the ingredients are boiling for five minutes and the rhubarb is soft and mushy.
  7. To test if the jam is done and will set once cooled remove the pan from the heat.  Use a tea spoon to place some jam on the back of one of the saucers from the freezer. Leave it for 30 seconds then push it with your finger. If it wrinkles up it’s ready. If it doesn’t keep boiling for another five minutes and try again on a fresh plate.
  8. Once it will set add the hot jam to warm jars and cover the ingredients inside the jar with a waxed disc of paper and close the lid. The wax paper is to protect and preserve the jam till it’s ready to eat. I don’t know why I bothered with the paper as I tucked into it that night! But if you are keeping it for longer or are planning to make some as gifts then seal it up well. This helps with keeping it sterilised.
  9. Once cooled store your jam in a dark place.

 

Tips when making jam

  • Always keep your equipment super clean.
  • Use the correct sugar. ‘Jam sugar’ has pectin in it which is a setting agent. Preserving sugar is something completely different.
  • If you’re not planning to eat the jam straight away it is doubly essential that the jam jars are sterile and the seal with wax paper and lid are air tight. Jams can last years if unopened.
  • Store unopened jam in a dark cupboard. Once open keep it in the fridge.
  • Keep your jam mould free for longer by not allowing sticky kids to stick knives inside the jar when it’s covered in butter (we all know they don’t mean to but goodness me!) We have a tea spoon rule for jam in our house and it lasts a lot longer now. I tell them it’s what the queen / Kate Middleton do!

How to make Rhubarb jam recipeenjoy!

EmmaMT x

How to make Challah bread: baking with mum

Challah bread baking with mumChallah recipe

Last week I went along to a challah baking day at the synagogue which was organised by my mum. I don’t tend to make bread all that often – being an impatient, quick bake a cake so I can eat it now, kind of girl. So this day was a real change for me.

There were fourteen bakers on the workshop and the ages literally spanned the generations from a two year old right up to granny ages ( I won’t divulge!)  We started out with all the ingredients measured into bowls for us and the lovely Israeli Dorit showed us what to do.

Bread dough feels so different from any other baking I do. It’s got a soft, squishiness to it. As a newbie I had no idea when to stop kneading and when to add flour, water or as was the case with one really sticky dough – oil! (yes we literally had the dough sticking to the table top then a dribble of oil and another knead and it was all together and smooth- no longer sticking anything not even our hands!)

After each stage we had to leave the dough to proove which meant tea and cakes with a good old natter while we waited. Once the Challah dough was ready Dorit showed us how to plait with three, four or more lengths. You literally just lift the right hand length then weave it under and over the other lengths. Then pic up the new right hand one and continue. The end result looked great once I had curled my plait into a circle.

Once out of the oven and smothered in honey the Challah was ready to be left to cool before eating – for once I waited! The bread was totally delicious.

You can print off this recipe here

Challah recipe

Starter:

  • 9g (2 ½ tsp) dried yeast
  • 25g (2 tbsp) sugar
  • 400ml (1 ½ cups) of warm water
  • 20g (2 tbsp) plain flour

Dough

  • 940g (6 cups) of plain flour
  • 135ml (⅓ cup) honey
  • ½ tsp salt
  • 1 medium egg whisked
  • 100g soft margarine

Decoration

  • 1 medium egg whisked
  • 2 tbsp honey (optional)
  • seasame seeds or poppy seeds

How to make Challah

This recipe is enough to make one whoppa of a challah or two good sized ones.

  1. In a small bowl mix the starter ingredients together with just a little of the water. Mix it into a paste before adding the rest of the water. It will become slightly frothy. Set aside for 10 minutes.
  2. Place all the dough ingredients into a large bowl and mix with a spoon to combine then get your hands stuck in and knead it till it’s a ball of sticky-ish dough.
  3. Cover with a tea towel and place in a warm room (the airing cupboard is perfect) and leave for an hour till the dough has doubled in size.
  4. BreadKnead the dough to knock the air out of it using a little olive oil if necessary. Set aside for another hour.
  5. Divide the dough into three equal balls, roll into long lengths then plait them together – tucking the ends underneath.
  6. Leave on the baking tray lined with baking paper for another 40 minutes so it rises even more.
  7. Heat your oven to 190ºC (Fan 170ºC). Brush with the egg wash and sprinkle seeds liberally over the top.
  8. Bake for 30 minutes or until the Challah sounds hollow when you tap it underneath.
  9. Brush honey over the top using a pastry brush as soon as the Challah comes out of the oven. Leave to cool.Challa recipe

Thanks mum for organising the Great Catford Challah bake. Everyone had a great time (and I hope we can do it again some time!)

EmmaMT x

 

p.s. A word of warning- Don’t bake bread on a Sunday evening, fall asleep in front of Downton Abbey and not hear the oven timer going off. The end result will not be good!

Burnt Challah

Lemon and Lime Madeira cake recipe

Lemon and Lime Madeira cake recipeLemon and Lime Madeira cake recipe

I’ve been wanting to test out this Lemon and Lime Madeira cake recipe for ages. I made it a few years ago for my sister’s charity cake morning but I didn’t measure the ingredients or take photos so when fellow Free Cakes For Kids volunteer Zowie had a Macmillian coffee morning  this weekend I thought it was the perfect opportunity to make it again.

It’s a bit of a show stopper as this time I made it three tiers tall and I have finally worked out how to have a decent amount of buttercream between layers without it all squidging out from the sides.

You can print this recipe and instructions here 

Lemon and Lime Madeira cake recipe

Cake ingredients

  • 170g Butter – at room temperature
  • 170g margarine – at room temperature
  • 400g caster sugar
  • Juice 1 lemon and 1 lime  (3 ½ tbsp cake, 1tbsp sugar syrup and 1 ½ tbsp buttercream)
  • Rind of 1 lemon and 1 lime  (½ for the cake, ½ for the buttercream)
  • 7 medium eggs- at room temperature
  • 510 plain flour
  • 3 ½ tsp baking powder
  • 7 tbsp water

Sugar syrup ingredients

  • 40g caster sugar
  • 40ml water
  • 1 tbsp lemon & lime juice (taken from original fruit)

Buttercream ingredients

  • 450g butter- at room temperature
  • 450g sieved icing sugar
  • 1 ½ tbsp lemon & lime juice (taken from original fruit)
  • Lemon and lime rindLemon and Lime Madeira cake

How to make the Lemon and Lime Madeira cake

To make the cake

  1. Line three 8″ cake tins with silicon paper and pre heat your oven to

    180ºC (Fan oven160ºC). I use sunflower oil to grease the tins so the cakes stay soft. Butter tends to bake too quickly giving you a harder cake on the outside.

  2. Start by creaming the butters together then add the sugar and beat till it’s pale and fluffy.

  3. Very slowly add the eggs – a spoonful at a time. Add a spoon of the flour to prevent curdling if necessary.

  4. Grate all of the rind from the lemon and the lime then juice them both. Run the juice through a sieve so there are no pips or pith. These will be used for the cake, the buttercream and the sugar syrup so don’t put it all in the cake at once or you’ll end up with a very, very zingy cake! Put 3 ½ tbsp of juice into the cake mix and set the rest aside.
  5. Sieve the flour and baking powder into a separate bowl and have the hot water ready. Add the flour and water in three goes. This produces the fluffiest and most moist cake rather than adding all the flour then all the water.

  6. Finally fold in half the zests.

  7. Spoon into the three cake tins. The mixture should be 565g for each tin – if you want really even cakes.
  8. Bake for 30-35 minutes or until a skewer comes out of the centre clean.

  9. Don’t open the oven door for the first 20 minutes. It will make the cake sink.

  10. Place the cakes on a wire to cool.

  11. Make the sugar syrup while the cakes are baking.

To make the sugar syrup

  1. Place the water and sugar into a saucepan and bring to a simmer.
  2. Simmer until all the sugar has dissolved then add the lemon and lime juice.
  3. Set aside and allow to cool.
  4. Once the cakes are out of the oven brush over the top of each cake with the sugar syrup. You only need to cover each area once. Don’t be tempted to put too much syrup on or you’ll end up with a soggy mess.
  5. Leave the cakes to cool for 15 minutes before turning them out of the tin to go completely cold before you arrange them with buttercream.

To make the buttercream

  1. Place all the ingredients in a bowl and beat until light and fluffy. This will take 3-5 minutes. If using a stand mixer you can carefully place a tea towel over the mixer -around the outside of the bowl to prevent the icing sugar being thrown out all over the place. If using a hand held mixer loosely combine the ingredients before whisking. 

  2. Make sure the cakes are level by cutting off any domes from the tops

  3. Fill a piping bag with a wide nozzle with the buttercream. Pipe dots all around the bottom cake layer then fill the inside. Use a spatula to smooth it a little.Lemon and Lime Madeira cake 1
  4. Place the next layer on top then repeat with the next layer of buttercream finishing off with the top layer of cake.
  5. Place in the fridge to chill for 10 minutes. This encourages the buttercream to harden up a little making it easier to spread buttercream on the outside edges.Lemon and Lime Madeira cake 2
  6. Use a little of the buttercream to spread a crumb coating on the top and outside edge – filling any gaps between the layers as you go, then chill in the fridge for 20 minutes. The longer it’s in the fridge the harder the coating will get and the easier it will be to add the next layer. I’ve been leaving the crumb coating a little bit rough (rather than smoothing it completely flat) recently and it’s made adding the outside coating much easier.
  7. Once the crumb coating is firm add a thicker outer coating all over the cake. Use a serrated ruler to create a design in the buttercream across the top and then on the sides.
  8. Place any decorations on the top (these Daisies were from Poundand) and then chill again for 10-15 minutes.

You can print this recipe and instructions here 

From what I tasted – I never leave an off-cut uneaten, that’s what buttercream is for isn’t it?  this is one seriously zesty, moist cake.

enjoy!

EmmaMT

Lemon and Lime Madeira cake 1

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