Tag: Madeira cake recipe

Lemon and Lime Madeira cake recipe

Lemon and Lime Madeira cake recipeLemon and Lime Madeira cake recipe

I’ve been wanting to test out this Lemon and Lime Madeira cake recipe for ages. I made it a few years ago for my sister’s charity cake morning but I didn’t measure the ingredients or take photos so when fellow Free Cakes For Kids volunteer Zowie had a Macmillian coffee morning  this weekend I thought it was the perfect opportunity to make it again.

It’s a bit of a show stopper as this time I made it three tiers tall and I have finally worked out how to have a decent amount of buttercream between layers without it all squidging out from the sides.

You can print this recipe and instructions here 

Lemon and Lime Madeira cake recipe

Cake ingredients

  • 170g Butter – at room temperature
  • 170g margarine – at room temperature
  • 400g caster sugar
  • Juice 1 lemon and 1 lime  (3 ½ tbsp cake, 1tbsp sugar syrup and 1 ½ tbsp buttercream)
  • Rind of 1 lemon and 1 lime  (½ for the cake, ½ for the buttercream)
  • 7 medium eggs- at room temperature
  • 510 plain flour
  • 3 ½ tsp baking powder
  • 7 tbsp water

Sugar syrup ingredients

  • 40g caster sugar
  • 40ml water
  • 1 tbsp lemon & lime juice (taken from original fruit)

Buttercream ingredients

  • 450g butter- at room temperature
  • 450g sieved icing sugar
  • 1 ½ tbsp lemon & lime juice (taken from original fruit)
  • Lemon and lime rindLemon and Lime Madeira cake

How to make the Lemon and Lime Madeira cake

To make the cake

  1. Line three 8″ cake tins with silicon paper and pre heat your oven to

    180ºC (Fan oven160ºC). I use sunflower oil to grease the tins so the cakes stay soft. Butter tends to bake too quickly giving you a harder cake on the outside.

  2. Start by creaming the butters together then add the sugar and beat till it’s pale and fluffy.

  3. Very slowly add the eggs – a spoonful at a time. Add a spoon of the flour to prevent curdling if necessary.

  4. Grate all of the rind from the lemon and the lime then juice them both. Run the juice through a sieve so there are no pips or pith. These will be used for the cake, the buttercream and the sugar syrup so don’t put it all in the cake at once or you’ll end up with a very, very zingy cake! Put 3 ½ tbsp of juice into the cake mix and set the rest aside.
  5. Sieve the flour and baking powder into a separate bowl and have the hot water ready. Add the flour and water in three goes. This produces the fluffiest and most moist cake rather than adding all the flour then all the water.

  6. Finally fold in half the zests.

  7. Spoon into the three cake tins. The mixture should be 565g for each tin – if you want really even cakes.
  8. Bake for 30-35 minutes or until a skewer comes out of the centre clean.

  9. Don’t open the oven door for the first 20 minutes. It will make the cake sink.

  10. Place the cakes on a wire to cool.

  11. Make the sugar syrup while the cakes are baking.

To make the sugar syrup

  1. Place the water and sugar into a saucepan and bring to a simmer.
  2. Simmer until all the sugar has dissolved then add the lemon and lime juice.
  3. Set aside and allow to cool.
  4. Once the cakes are out of the oven brush over the top of each cake with the sugar syrup. You only need to cover each area once. Don’t be tempted to put too much syrup on or you’ll end up with a soggy mess.
  5. Leave the cakes to cool for 15 minutes before turning them out of the tin to go completely cold before you arrange them with buttercream.

To make the buttercream

  1. Place all the ingredients in a bowl and beat until light and fluffy. This will take 3-5 minutes. If using a stand mixer you can carefully place a tea towel over the mixer -around the outside of the bowl to prevent the icing sugar being thrown out all over the place. If using a hand held mixer loosely combine the ingredients before whisking. 

  2. Make sure the cakes are level by cutting off any domes from the tops

  3. Fill a piping bag with a wide nozzle with the buttercream. Pipe dots all around the bottom cake layer then fill the inside. Use a spatula to smooth it a little.Lemon and Lime Madeira cake 1
  4. Place the next layer on top then repeat with the next layer of buttercream finishing off with the top layer of cake.
  5. Place in the fridge to chill for 10 minutes. This encourages the buttercream to harden up a little making it easier to spread buttercream on the outside edges.Lemon and Lime Madeira cake 2
  6. Use a little of the buttercream to spread a crumb coating on the top and outside edge – filling any gaps between the layers as you go, then chill in the fridge for 20 minutes. The longer it’s in the fridge the harder the coating will get and the easier it will be to add the next layer. I’ve been leaving the crumb coating a little bit rough (rather than smoothing it completely flat) recently and it’s made adding the outside coating much easier.
  7. Once the crumb coating is firm add a thicker outer coating all over the cake. Use a serrated ruler to create a design in the buttercream across the top and then on the sides.
  8. Place any decorations on the top (these Daisies were from Poundand) and then chill again for 10-15 minutes.

You can print this recipe and instructions here 

From what I tasted – I never leave an off-cut uneaten, that’s what buttercream is for isn’t it?  this is one seriously zesty, moist cake.

enjoy!

EmmaMT

Lemon and Lime Madeira cake 1

FAQ: Do you have a 10″ Madeira cake recipe?

FAQ: Do you have a 10″ Madeira cake recipe?10" Madeira cake recipe

Yes I do, but boy do people seem to be having problems with it! It got to the point where I was starting to think there was something wrong with it. Readers were having cakes with soggy middles and deep dark crusts on the outside. There were massive domes and sunken middles. I was perplexed! So, I decided to double check the recipe. It came out perfectly. So here’s a post dedicated to exactly what I do to make my 10″ Madeira cake a success  – literally step by step.

Double check the size of your tin.

The first thing I did was measure the volume of water my 10″ cake could take. Previously I found it could hold 4000ml but I decided to try it with a little less – 3700ml. The reason for this is that when I make a larger cake the more mix in the tin the heavier the cake is. When I use a little less mix the cake seems to rise more. This was the case with this cake. Just removing 300ml of cake ingredients to this cake made all the difference.

Line and wrap your cake tin and chill it out!

I have always lined my cake tins using silicon paper and vegetable oil – to make it stick to the sides. Oil gives the cake a much softer finish. I know some people like a crust and if that’s the case keep using butter to grease your tins.

Once lined I wrap the cake tin with a strip of silicon paper tied with natural string. You can read more about this here. As you can see from the top photo, I use the same paper over and over and it still works well.

A new trick I recently read about was to chill the cake tin once it is lined. This further stops the outside of the cake from baking too quickly. I left mine in the fridge for 30 minutes before I filled it with cake mix and baked it.

10" Madeira cake recipeThe 10″ Madeira cake recipe

  • 235g butter at room temperature
  • 235g margarine at room temperature
  • 620g caster sugar
  • 3 tsp vanilla essence
  • 9 eggs large eggs at room temperature
  • 700g plain flour sieved
  • 5 tsp baking powder
  • 150ml hot water

Sugar syrup

  • 100ml water
  • 100g caster sugar
  • 1 tsp vanilla essence

How to make the 10″ Madeira cake.

  1. Pre-heat your oven to 180ºC (Fan oven160ºC) It’s really important to get the oven to the right temperature. The rising domes are usually caused by the oven being too hot. Sunken cakes are from when the oven temperature is too low – or the oven door is opened too early. My oven fluctuates (especially with cakes that are in the oven for a long time like this one!) so I tend to let it drop a little to 175ºC to allow for the differences during the bake. I still get a dome but I don’t mind. It means I can see how well the cake is baked and get to eat a bit too. Who doesn’t love off cuts? The biggest problems with baking this cake seem to come from using a fan oven. It just doesn’t bake as well. I tested the recipe out using my fan and the cake tasted completely different and was really heavy. My mum who has a gas oven always has the lightest, fluffiest Madeira cake known to man – I am very jealous! So if oyu can use a non fan oven do. If you can use gas – even better. One last word on temperatures is to invest in an Oven Thermometer . I trust mine way more than I trust the dial on my oven – which has lied to me from day one!
  2. Start teh cake mix by creaming the butter and margarine together. Make sure they are seamlessly blended before adding the sugar. Beat till it’s pale and fluffy. This will take at least 3-4 minutes. The whiter it looks the fluffier it is which makes a lighter cake. 
  3. Very slowly add the eggs – a spoonful at a time. The slower you add the eggs the less chance there is of the mixture curdling. I have found that I have a much better mix if I use my very fast hand held whisk rather than my beloved Kitchenaid stand mixer. The hand held is much faster and whips it all up into a frenzy catching every last bit of cake mix whereas the stand mixer gets most of it most of the time. There’s no comparison. If the mixture does start curdling (separating and looking a bit yuck) add a spoonful of flour during mixing to stop it.
  4. Add the vanilla essence and mix again till it’s well incorporated.
  5. When it comes to adding the dry ingredients I tend to sieve the flour and baking powder into a separate bowl and have the hot water ready. Add the flour and water in three goes. This produces the fluffiest and most moist cake rather than adding all the flour then all the water. Fold them in gently and slowly. Fold until the flour is just incorporated. The less mixing and folding the more air bubbles you’ll have to make a light and fluffy cake. 
  6. Pour the mixture into the cake tin. Using the back of a spoon spread the mix throughout the tin pushing it up the sides of the tin slightly leaving a well in the middle. I leave quite a deep well and still get a dome so be brave.
  7. I have been loosely covering my cakes as soon as they go into the oven with a piece of silicon paper with a hole in the middle. If I think the paper is going to touch the cake as it rises I grease it first. The hole is to allow the steam to escape. The paper keeps the cake more flat on top. I tend to remove the paper for the last 30 minutes so it can brown up.
  8. Bake for two hours in the centre of your oven. If you have the choice place your cake on a wire rack in the oven rather than a tray. A tray will stop the heat from circulating. I remove all the unused racks from the oven when I bake. Don’t be tempted to open the oven door for the first 30 minutes. It will make the cake sink.
  9. To test if your cake is fully baked insert a skewer into the centre of the cake – always the centre as this is the last area to bake. If it comes out clean without any cake mix residue it’s ready. If there is some moist mix on the end you need to pop it back in for a few minutes more. You can also press lightly on the top of the cake with a finger. If the cake bounces back instantly you know it’s done. If it takes more than 2-3 seconds then you know it needs more.

    When a cake bakes the outer edge bakes first (as it’s against the hot metal cake tin.) For this reason when the middle of your cake is baked the sides will shrink away from the cake tin. This is another good indicator that the cake is baked.

10" Madeira cake recipeThe sugar syrup

  1. To make the sugar syrup heat the water and sugar until the sugar is completely dissolved. Let it simmer for 2-3 minutes then add the flavour and leave to cool. I make my sugar syrup as soon as the cake goes into the oven then I leave it .
  2. Once your cake is removed from the oven let it sit for 5-10 minutes then use a pastry brush to brush the sugar syrup over the entire cake. You only need to cover each area of the cake once and avoid soaking the cake or you will end up with a big soggy mess not a nice moist cake. Make sure you get the edges of the cake covered as they tend to dry out the most. Some people worry that the cake will be overly sweet by adding the sugar syrup but it actually seals the cake and stops it from baking once it’s out of the oven. Don’t feel you need to use the whole amount. You will have some left over.
  3. Leave the cake to cool for a further 10-20 minutes before turning your cake out onto a rack to cool completely.

Madeira cake slice - recipe

I made this cake and decided not to cover it or cut it in half and fill with butter cream. One of my favorite ways to enjoy Madeira cake is by the slice with a lovely dollop of raspberry jam. I cut this one in half and froze one side while we ate the rest. This is a pretty big cake so it was a good test of how long it tasted good for. I always advise to have eaten a cake that has been decorated (and therefore sealed) within a week of baking. This cake sat on a plate in my kitchen loosely covered with a piece of silver foil for 10 days – slowly getting smaller and smaller. On the 10th day it was getting a bit stale but right up till then a spread of jam and it was great with a cup of tea!

Why Sugar syrup works

Another benefit to adding sugar syrup to a cake – which I hadn’t realised before is that it gives the cake crust a lovely sweet flavoured crunch. Not a hard crunch – just a gentle one. I actually looked forward to eating that part as much as I did the soft sponge. Nice surprise!

I think a lovely thin slice is perfect. Beau does not! After asking if she could have a slice this is what she cut and filled for herself! I could have made four servings from that giant slice. And before you ask- yes she ate the lot! Growing girl! Beau's big slice!!!

I hope this helps with some of your Madeira cake queries.

Happy baking

EmmaMT

x

Evie’s Easy Minecraft Birthday cake

How to make a Minecraft cake for a gorgeous girl

Evie’s Minecraft Birthday cake

Minecraft is absolutely massive in our house. In fact I’d go as far as saying it’s my strongest bargaining tool. “If you don’t finish your homework there’ll be no Minecraft!” Works every time.

This isn’t my first Minecraft birthday cake – it’s actually my third but it is the first one for a girl. Evie is the cutie who I bake gluten free cakes and biscuits for when there’s a school cake sale. I can’t stand the thought of her missing out on cake!

Gluten Free Madeira cake

This cake is a gluten free Madeira cake. Having made a few gluten free recipes now I know that I get the best results by swapping out regular flour and replacing it with 50% gluten free flour and 50% rice or almond flour. It just works better. Sometimes I add an extra egg after I was advised that gluten free flours make cakes more dry and an extra egg makes “all the difference”.

This is the Madeira cake recipe I used. 

How to make a Minecraft cake I wanted to make it quite a cute Minecraft birthday cake without any weapons so I went for the trees and bushes route with a pretty pink ‘Evie/Steve’. Evie seemed pretty happy with it when she saw it.

Although quite a simple design don’t be fooled by it’s simplicity. Cutting and positioning all those squares takes time – but that could be because I was watching Netflix whilst making this cake and that always slows me down!

How to make a Minecraft personGirls Minecreaft birthday cake

It’s really easy to make a Minecraft person if you have plenty of time to leave it to harden. That’s the key to being able to handle the model and it not break.

I start by rolling out the sugar paste and cutting out the body and sleeves. To give the legs more strength I make one large rectangle and use a cutter to make an indent where the legs separate rather than cutting two separate legs and sticking them together. Insert half a cocktail stick into the top of each leg with a little edible glue and insert into the body.

Use edible glue to stick the sleeves to the body and then do the same with the arms and head. Insert half a cocktail stick into the bottom of each leg once you have glued the feet in place.  Finally add the head. Check that the model will stand up straight as you go by standing it in a polystyrene block with something for it to lean against so it’s at 90º.

I wrapped the whole model in cling film so it would stick in place and left it over night to harden. Girls Minecreaft birthday cake

To make the trees I cut out squares of brown sugar paste with a plunger cutter and made holes in the centres so I could insert cocktail sticks into them. I threaded the squares onto the sticks; gluing as I went, until I had a few in a row. The sticks were then inserted into the polystyrene so they were upright and could harden over night. The large green tree tops and bushes were made from larger squares of sugar paste which had holes made in the bottom and were left to harden. The harder the green tops and brown tree trunks are the better as they won’t collapse so easily so try to make these in advance.

The outer edge of the cake was surrounded with three colours of green square so they looked like grass- kind of!

Minecraft birthday cake

An ‘8’ was added to the front of the cake using pink squares.

Girls Minecreaft birthday cake

Once the model had hardened and could be handled the hair was added and the face was painted on. I added an ‘E’ for Evie onto the body.

Then all the elements are added onto the cake and that’s it.

I hope this has been helpful.

Have you made a Minecraft cake? Are you about to? I’d love to see it. Just head on over to the CakesBakesAndCookies.com Facebook or Twitter page and post a picture to share with us bakers. I’m sure we’d all like to see them. Follow the links below.

Bye for now

EmmaMT

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FAQ:Recipe for a 14″ Madeira cake

14" Madeira cake recipeI seem to have had a lot of enquires recently for a recipe for a 14″ Madeira cake. I don’t actually have a tin this big (the one above is a 12″) but one of my readers measured the volume of her tin and I calculated the ingredients she would need. She said it as a huge success.

To keep it moist I bake all my Madeira cakes with some baking paper wrapped around the outside of the tin. I also place an ovenproof bowl of water at the bottom of the oven which locks more moisture in. My last trick is to add the flour and water in three separate stages – so alternating the flour then water then flour and water and so on). This makes a huge difference compared with adding all the flour then all the water.

 14″ Square Madeira cake recipe.

  • 310g butter- at room temperature
  • 310g Margarine- at room temperature
  • 830g caster sugar
  • 4 ½ tea spoon vanilla essence
  • 13 eggs-at room temperature
  • 930g plain flour
  • 6 ½ teasp of baking powder
  • 12 ½ tbsp hot water
  • Line a cake tin with baking paper and wrap the outside of the cake tin with paper (see how I do it here)
  1. Blend the butters and sugar together until light and fluffy – this will take 2-3 minutes.
  2. Add the eggs one at a time and whisk in thoroughly. Don’t miss this step and chuck them all in – in one go. Your mixture will curdle. I have also found that a hand held whisk gets better results than a stand mixer
  3. Add vanilla essence and blend.
  4. In a separate bowl sieve the flour and baking powder. Mix 1/3 of the flour into the cake mix and whisk. Add 1/3 of the water and combine. Repeat until everything is well incorporated.
  5. Place the mixture in the cake tin smoothing with the back of a metal spoon.
  6. Bake at 180ºC (160º Fan) for 120-140 minutes but check it regularly as sometimes it needs a little longer.
  7. To prevent your cake from doming place a piece of baking paper with a hole in the centre  over the top of the tin. Remove the paper after 90 minutes so the top can brown up nicely.
  8. Leave to cool on a wire tray.

I hope this has been helpful. If you are looking for ingredients of other sizes of Madeira cakes have a look at this post.

 

Have fun baking!

EmmaMT

x

How to adapt a cake recipe for different size tins and a 10″ Madeira cake recipe.

How to adapt a cake recipe for different size tins 

Madeira cakeLast week I made a two tier wedding cake for a friend and I decided that it was about time I really mastered getting the right amounts of ingredients for different sized cake tins, rather than doubling and hoping for the best. I got the basic gist of how to work it out from Ruth Clemens on her Pink whisk blog. You take your basic recipe and then measure the volume of water that the cake tin will hold. Now my Madeira cake recipe is for an 8″ cake but I find that the cake isn’t as deep as I’d like it to be. It usually only comes out about 3/4 of the depth of the tin, so I have been experimenting.

My goal was to have a cake that would rise to just above the rim of the cake tin so that I could skim off the top to make sure that it’s perfectly flat – ready for decorating. So I used my 8″ recipe in a 6″ tin and voila. Perfect result. So that was my base to work with.

(more…)

How to make a sprinkle cake

Dahlia 2nd birthday cake

So following on from my My top 5 cake disaster tips! Here’s how I made the sprinkle cake before disaster struck!

I wanted the cake to be nice and tall. As it was for Dahlia’s 2nd birthday and she is a pretty, girly little thing,  it had to be pink.  I made four 8″ Madeira cakes to stack with raspberry jam and coloured buttercream. I also wanted it to be a sprinkle cake on the inside too, so I added some sprinkles to the cake mix just before they went into the oven. It didn’t really work out as I had planned. I put in 55g (which is one entire pot) but they didn’t really show up very well when the cake was cut. I think next time I will put in 110g so it’s super colourful inside. The good thing about adding sprinkles to the cake mix is that they are sugar so they just melt into the sponge.

 

The Madeira cake recipe 

(Makes four  8″ round cakes)

For the cakes

  • 150g butter – at room temperature
  • 150g margarine ( I use Flora)
  • 400g caster sugar
  • 2 tsp vanilla essence
  • 6 eggs (large and at room temperature. Lightly whisked)
  • 450g Plain flour – sieved
  • 3 tsp baking powder
  • 5 tbsp hot water
  • 50-100g sprinkles
  1. Grease and line your baking tins. If you need to bake in two goes ( 2 cake layers at a time) only mix up enough ingredients to bake two cakes. Don’t have cake mix sitting around waiting for the first cake tins be become free. The cake mix will lose air and the cakes won’t rise as much as they should. 
  2. Heat your oven to 180ºC (160ºC Fan)
  3. Mix the butter and margarine together well then add the sugar and beat until pale and fluffy. This will take 2-3 minutes.
  4. Add the egg a little at a time until it’s combined. If it starts to curdle add a spoonful of the flour.
  5. Add the vanilla essence.
  6. Add the flour (with the baking powder) in three batches alternating with the hot water. I’ve just discovered this neat little trick. It makes the cakes more moist and they will have fewer holes in the sponge compared to adding all the flour then all the water. Add sprinkles and mix.
  7. Pour cake mix into each cake tin. In order to keep the cakes the same depth once baked aim for 350g of cake mix in each tin.
  8. Bake for 30 minutes or until the cake comes away from the sides and a light press in the centre of the cake springs back instantly.
  9. Leave to cool completely on a wire rack.
  10. If storing overnight, once cool wrap your cakes in clingfilm but don’t stack them directly on top of each other as they may stick together.

 

For the buttercream decorations

  • ½ Jar of seedless raspberry jam
  • 500g butter- at room temperature (President butter tastes best)
  • 1kg icing sugar
  • 2 tsp vanilla essence
  • pink food colour
  • sprinkles to scatter – (I used around  100-150g)
  1. Place the butter in a mixing bowl then sieve the icing sugar over the top. I place a tea towel carefully over the mixer (make sure it is safe guys!) so that the puffs of icing sugar don’t coat my whole kitchen. Once it’s combined add the vanilla essence and mix again. If it’s too thick you can add a little milk to soften it. 
  2. Add a little pink food colouring at a time till you get the desired colour

Decorating the Sprinkle cake 

Sprinkle birthday cake

Heat up the raspberry jam in a microwaveable dish for a few seconds at a time until it is nice and runny.  Use a silicon pastry brush to cover the whole of the first layer of cake. Leave the cake to cool a bit – otherwise it will melt the buttercream and your next layer will slide off.

Take the second cake layer and smoother it with buttercream then position it buttercream side down over the jam. Repeat until you have done all layers.

Sprinkle birthday cake

Give the whole cake a crumb coat. This is the first coating of buttercream which seals in any crumbs in and hides any lines in the cake lauers. It doesn’t have to be perfect but the neater it is now the better your top coat will be. I didn’t cover the top as I was going to roll the cake in sprinkles if I didn’t like the initial effect and I would have needed to handle the top if that was the case.

Pop the cake in the fridge to firm up for at least 20 minutes.

 

Sprinkle birthday cake

Give the cake a second ‘top coat’ of buttercream. This is the one that you want to be as straight and smooth as possible. I use a spatula to add the buttercream then use a side scraper to make sure it’s straight.

 

Sprinkle birthday cake

A smoother is the perfect tool to drag around the cake to get a smooth finish.

 

Sprinkle birthday cake

I put the cake on a cakestand (because I am crazy- if you haven’t read why you can do so here!)  And prepared to add the sprinkles. You need to add them while the cake is still freshly buttercreamed so they stick well. The way this cake looks is how I imagined it turn out, but if it all went wrong then I planned to roll the whole cake in sprinkles to coat the whole thing. For that I would have needed to hold the top and bottom of the cake- hence I didn’t buttercream the top till the very end.

Sprinkle birthday cake

To add the sprinkles I placed the cakestand over a tray and poured the sprinkles onto the bottom edge. I then threw small handfuls at the sides so there were just a few all over the cake. When I was happy with the look – and I had forced Darcey to stop throwing sprinkles all over the place and at my cake) I coated the top.

 

Sprinkle birthday cake

To make a clear number 2 I placed the largest cookie cutter I had in the centre then carefully poured some sprinkles inside. I used a decorators paintbrush to press them down so they stuck in place when the cutter was lifted off.

 

SPRINKLE BIRTHDAY CAKE

 

The last thing to do was to remove any loose sprinkles from the cakestand and try to deliver it. Try being the word!

 

EmmaMT 

 

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